top of page

The virus can be transmitted through contact with infected blood, semen or vaginal fluids are AIDS.







What is called HIV and AIDS?

HIV and AIDS are also called human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immuno deficiency syndrome.


HIV causes AIDS and interferes with the body's ability to fight infections.


The virus can be transmitted through contact with infected blood, semen or vaginal fluids.


What are Common way to spread?

~Spreads by sexual contact.

~Treatment can help, but this condition can't be cured.

~Chronic can last for years or be lifelong

~Requires a medical diagnosis.

~Lab tests or imaging always required.


How can be AIDS and HIV spread?

~By blood products.

~unclean needles or unscreened blood.

~By having unprotected vaginal, anal or oral sex.

~By mother to baby by pregnancy, labour or nursing.


What are the Common Symptoms of AIDS?

Requires a medical diagnosis

Within a few weeks of HIV infection, flu-like symptoms such as fever, sore throat and fatigue can occur.




Then the disease is usually asymptomatic until it progresses to AIDS.


AIDS symptoms include weight loss, fever or night sweats, fatigue and recurrent infections.


How to treat consists of HIV antivirals?

No cure exists for AIDS, but strict adherence to antiretroviral regimens (ARVs) can dramatically slow the disease's progress as well as prevent secondary infections and complications.


What's Comment on 5 stages of AIDS?

Without treatment, HIV infection advances in stages, getting worse over time.


HIV gradually destroys the immune system and eventually causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

~HIV Progression

~Acute HIV Infection.

~Chronic HIV Infection.

~AIDS.


Which AIDS person survive?

Thirty years ago, being diagnosed with HIV was considered a death sentence.


Today, people with HIV can live long and healthy lives. That's why routine HIV screening is vital.


Early detection and timely treatment are key to managing the virus, extending life expectancy, and reducing the risk of transmission.


Why AIDS are called now?

Also called Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, AIDS, HIV, Human immunodeficiency virus.


Why does AIDS affect the body?

HIV finds the white blood cells, called CD4 cells. HIV gets inside the CD4 cell and makes copies of itself.


Then, HIV kills the CD4 cell and the new HIV copies find other CD4 cells to get inside and start the cycle again.


HIV kills immune system cells that help the body fight infections and diseases.


What is the common symptoms of HIV?

HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a virus that attacks the body's immune system.


If HIV is not treated, it can lead to AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome).




There is currently no effective cure. Once people get HIV, they have it for life.

But with proper medical care, HIV can be controlled.


People with HIV who get effective HIV treatment can live long, healthy lives and protect their partners.


What's the stages of HIV?

When people with HIV don't get treatment, they typically progress through three stages.


But HIV treatment can slow or prevent progression of the disease. With advances in HIV treatment, progression to Stage 3 (AIDS) is less common today than in the early years of HIV.


People have a large amount of HIV in their blood and are very contagious.


Many people have flu-like symptoms.

If you have flu-like symptoms and think you may have been exposed to HIV, get tested.


This stage is also called asymptomatic HIV infection or clinical latency.


HIV is still active and continues to reproduce in the body.


People may not have any symptoms or get sick during this phase but can transmit HIV.


People who take HIV treatment as prescribed may never move into Stage 3 (AIDS).






Without HIV treatment, this stage may last a decade or longer, or may progress faster. At the end of this stage, the amount of HIV in the blood (viral load) goes up and the person may move into Stage 3 (AIDS).


How is HIV different from AIDS?

HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) is a virus that attacks the body's immune system.


If HIV is not treated, it can lead to AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). There is currently no effective cure. Once people get HIV, they have it for life.


Why you have AIDS without HIV?

AIDS is a syndrome, or range of symptoms, that may develop in time in a person with HIV who does not receive treatment.


A person can have HIV without developing AIDS, but it is not possible to have AIDS without first having HIV.


What are the Primary infection?

(Acute HIV)

Some people infected by HIV develop a flu-like illness within 2 to 4 weeks after the virus enters the body.


This illness, known as primary (acute) HIV infection, may last for a few weeks.


What are the Possible signs and symptoms? Here are some major possible symptoms and issue are given below:-

~Fever.

~Headache.

~Muscle aches and joint pain.

~Rash.

~Sore throat.

~painful mouth sores.

~Swollen lymph glands.

~mainly on the neck.

~Diarrhea.

~Weight loss.

~Cough.

~Night sweats.




What are the Symptomatic HIV infection?

As the virus continues to multiply and destroy your immune cells. the cells in your body that help fight off germs.


you may develop mild infections or chronic signs and symptoms such as:-

~Fever.

~Fatigue.

~Swollen lymph nodes.

~first signs of HIV infection.

~Diarrhea.

~Weight loss.

~Oral yeast infection (thrush).

~Shingles (herpes zoster).

~Pneumonia.


What are the Progression to AIDS?

Access to better antiviral treatments has dramatically decreased deaths from AIDS worldwide, even in resource-poor countries.


Thanks to these life-saving treatments, most people with HIV in the U.S. today don't develop AIDS. Untreated, HIV typically turns into AIDS in about 8 to 10 years.


When does AIDS occurs?

your immune system has been severely damaged. You'll be more likely to develop diseases that wouldn't usually cause illness in a person with a healthy immune system. These are called opportunistic infections or opportunistic cancers.



The signs and symptoms are some of these infections may include:-

Sweats

Chills

Recurring fever

Chronic diarrhea

Swollen lymph glands

Persistent white spots or

unusual lesions on your tongue or

in your mouth

Persistent,

unexplained fatigue

Weakness

Weight loss

Skin rashes or bumps


When we should go to doctor?

If you think you may have been infected with HIV or are at risk of contracting the virus, see a health care provider as soon as possible.


When does HIV become AIDS?

You can have an HIV infection, with few or no symptoms, for years before it turns into AIDS. AIDS is diagnosed when the CD4 T cell count falls below 200 or you have an AIDS-defining complication, such as a serious infection or cancer.


How we know HIV spreads?

To become infected with HIV, infected blood, semen or vaginal secretions must enter your body. This can happen in several ways.


When does HIV spreads?

By having sex

You may become infected if you have vaginal, anal or oral sex with an infected partner whose blood, semen or vaginal secretions enter your body.






The virus can enter your body through mouth sores or small tears that sometimes develop in the rectum or vagina during sexual activity.


When does HIV spreads?

By sharing needles

Sharing contaminated injection drug paraphernalia (needles and syringes) puts you at high risk of HIV and other infectious diseases, such as hepatitis.


When does HIV spreads?

From blood transfusions

In some cases, the virus may be transmitted through blood transfusions.


Hospitals and blood banks screen the blood supply for HIV, so this risk is very small in the U.S. and other upper-middle-income countries.


The risk may be higher in low-income countries that are not able to screen all donated blood.


When HIV virus on to their babies?

During pregnancy or delivery or through breastfeeding. Infected mothers can pass the virus on to their babies. Mothers who are HIV-positive and get treatment for the infection during pregnancy can significantly lower the risk to their babies.




What are the Risk factors?

Have unprotected sex. Use a new latex or polyurethane condom every time you have sex.


Which type of sex are more risk?

Anal sex is riskier than is vaginal sex. Your risk of HIV increases if you have multiple sexual partners.


What when Have an STI?

Many STIs produce open sores on your genitals. These sores act as doorways for HIV to enter your body.


What's illicit injection drugs?

Use illicit injection drugs. People who use illicit injection drugs often share needles and syringes. This exposes them to droplets of other people's blood.


What are the Prevention methods?

There's no vaccine to prevent HIV infection and no cure for HIV/AIDS. But you can protect yourself and others from infection.




what prevent the spread of HIV?

Consider preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP). The combination oral drugs emtricitabine plus tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (Truvada) and emtricitabine plus tenofovir alafenamide fumarate (Descovy) can reduce the risk of sexually transmitted HIV infection in people at very high risk.


PrEP can reduce your risk of getting HIV from sex by about 99% and from injection drug use by at least 74%, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


Descovy hasn't been studied in people who have receptive vaginal sex.


What's the FDA?

The FDA recently approved cabotegravir (Apretude), the first injectable PrEP to reduce the risk of sexually transmitted HIV infection in people at very high risk.


The injection is given by a health care provider. After the first two monthly injections, cabotegravir is given every two months. The injection is an option in place of a daily PrEP pill.



Which drugs for HIV prevention?

Your health care provider will prescribe these drugs for HIV prevention only if you don't already have HIV infection. You will need an HIV test before you start taking any PrEP.


The test should then be done every three months for pills or before each injection for as long as you're taking PrEP. Your health care provider will also test your kidney function before prescribing Truvada and continue to test it every 6 to 12 months. Other regular testing may also be needed.


Which pill for HIV prevention?

You need to take the pill form every day or closely follow the injection schedule for cabotegravir.


They don't prevent other STIs, so you'll still need to practice safe sex. If you have hepatitis B, you should be evaluated by an infectious disease or liver specialist before beginning therapy.


What are the opportunistic infections or opportunistic cancers?

your immune system has been severely damaged. You'll be more likely to develop diseases that wouldn't usually cause illness in a person with a healthy immune system. These are called opportunistic infections or opportunistic cancers.































16 views0 comments

Kommentare


bottom of page